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  • Doc_V
    commented on 's reply
    Exactly!

  • Doc_V
    commented on 's reply
    Glad it helped. It's what I love about the RSC; I've learned so much from so many here.

  • Smokescreens
    replied
    i always stick a clear hose onto the bleeder as well. it serves two purposes.
    1. if you do mess up your just sucking back in the old fluid.
    2. you can get a very good clear view of the fluid as it comes out to see how fresh it is. it wl be dirty and then quickly change over to fresh over the span of 2 or three bleeds.

    i normally change fluid every 2-3 years at the most. its cheap and keeps maintainence at top notch.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lug Nut
    replied
    I flush brake fluid every 2 years on all my bikes. I use a powered vacuum bleeder ($30 harbor freight) hooked to an air compressor. Easy job for one person with powered vacuum bleeder and 8mm wrench. I also us Prestone synthetic DOT 4 brake fluid and it works great.

    Leave a comment:


  • J89k
    replied
    I want to get some stainless braided lines but saving for that roadwing. Instead of fresh lines I bled the brakes. This thread was super helpful. No issues whatsoever. Thank you Doc_V, in particular.

    I put fresh rear brakes and rotor on when I got the bike back in September. I've put on about 4500 miles since then. needed to do the pads up front but the rotors seem to be doing alright.

    Leave a comment:


  • fastjohnny
    commented on 's reply
    It is the original brake fluid.....I should hav4e changed it years ago...

  • TimB
    commented on 's reply
    Routine maintenance is always a good idea

  • Deerkiller
    replied
    Brake fluid should be changed periodically because it absorbs moisture and becomes less effective over time. Simple explanation. Google it for more detailed info

    Or, come to the mountains and ride your bike hard for awhile for a first hand experience on why replacing old brake fluid is a good idea. I’ve seen it happen more than once.

    Leave a comment:


  • sta-lor
    replied
    why are you changing it ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Leadkrm
    replied
    The lever was super jerky and coarse when I got my bike. I got some new fluid and bled the old out and cleaned the piston in the master cylinder. It took hardly any time at all. Once you get the process, you will be able to bleed calipers like a champ. I remember over thinking the process so much.

    Leave a comment:


  • TimB
    replied
    $1.87 for 12' of clear hose is all it cost. People make it MUCH harder than it really is. 8mm box end wrench is the only tool needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Father Pobasturd
    replied
    All this sounds so complicated. If you can just take your bike into outer space you won't have to worry about air getting in there. See,
    isn't that simpler?



    Leave a comment:


  • Doc_V
    replied
    Not to be flippant, but if someone is having trouble bleeding the brakes or flushing the fluid, then they're probably doing something wrong. I'm always surprised by all the posts of people who struggle because it's really pretty easy.


    Before you begin, you'll need a two foot piece of clear vinyl tubing, just large enough diameter to slip TIGHTLY over the caliper bleeder nipple*, and a small clear bottle or jar of at least 12oz or more. Skinny and tall works better than short and wide. An old beer bottle works well.


    Starting with the front brakes:
    - Before you remove the reservoir cap, wipe it down and make sure it and the reservoir is clean of *all* dirt and grime that may fall into the fluid. DO NOT LET ANY DUST OR DIRT GET IN THE FLUID OR ON THE COVER!
    - Wrap a shop towel around the reservoir, because the stuff is HIGHLY corrosive and if [when] you spill any brake fluid, it will strip paint and EAT through rubber etc. if you don't WIPE IT OFF QUICKLY AND THOROUGHLY!
    - Remove the screws and leave the cap on for now.

    - Start with the caliper furthest from the reservoir [the left / shifter side.]
    - Slip one end of the tubing over the bleeder nipple. [The tube should have to stretch a little to fit over the nipple.]
    - Next, take bottle [or jar] and fill it with at least 3 inches of fluid.
    - Stick the other end of the tube in to the jar; BE CERTAIN THE END STAYS SUBMERGED UNDER THE FLUID!!!
    [This will prevent air from getting sucked back into the system.]
    - Now remove the reservoir cap and top off with fluid if necessary.

    - Next, begin pumping the brake lever until firm and HOLD it with one hand.
    - With then other hand, using an open end wrench [or spanner for you Brits], loosen the bleeder nipple until fluid comes out. [Get a friend if your arms aren't long enough]
    Note: don't over loosen the bleeder; just enough so fluid flows freely.
    - AS SOON AS THE FLUID STOPS, CLOSE OFF THE BLEEDER BY TIGHTENING THE NIPPLE.
    - Pump the brake lever again until firm and repeat.

    - BE SURE TO KEEP AN EYE ON THE FLUID LEVEL IN THE RESERVOIR AND TOP OFF AS NEEDED!
    [If you let the reservoir empty out, you will introduce air in to the system and cause MAJOR headaches.


    That's pretty much it! Repeat this process until you see clean new fluid in the tube then move to the other side and repeat. After that go back to the left side and repeat again. You may still see some dirty fluid or small bubbles, so just keep alternating side to side until you see clean fluid and NO BUBBLES on both sides. It may take several cycles, side to side, to remove all the old fluid and bubbles.

    - Repeat the process on the rear brake.

    Tips: Secure the bottle/jar so it doesn't tip over. Also, as long as you have fluid in the clear vinyl hose, WITH NO BUBBLES, it's OK if some fluid gets sucked back in the bleeder while you're tightening the nipple. If you have a cap or lid for the bottle/jar, save it and the old fluid for next time.

    That's' it. It should be a straight forward job and take less than 45 mins. And that's if you're taking your time.

    P.S. Sure the speed bleeders help; but they're not necessary.

    *Sorry but I don't know the exact tube size, it's about the diameter of a pencil, but the stuff is cheap and readily available at most any hardware store so get a couple different sizes to be safe.
    Last edited by Doc_V; 01-01-2019, 12:33 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • RonK
    replied
    --

    I do like MBK does and use Speed Bleeders. It makes it so simple. As to sucking all the old fluid out first, I don't do that as it can leave an air bubble mostly in the T for the front calipers and it can be a bugger to get it out. There isn't that much fluid in the lines anyway, so you will get the old fluid out with just a few fills in the master cylinder.

    --

    Leave a comment:


  • mbk
    replied
    I invested in a set of speed bleeders for my bike off eBay. Beat the hell out of constantly opening and closing the bleeder valves while purging the new fluid through the lines and calipers. Everything else is the same, like others mentioned. Get as much fluid out of the reservoir as you can and fill with new. I had a clear hose over the bleeder and into a can to catch the old fluid as it is pumped out by working the brake lever / pedal. Make sure you keep a close eye on the reservoir level to not run it dry and thus pump air into the system.

    Short version of the auction description:
    The Speed Bleeder is truly a one-person bleeder screw. Once installed, it becomes a permanent part of the brake system. When it is time to bleed your brakes, you loosen the Speed Bleeder ¼ to ½
    turns and pump your brake pedal or brake lever. When the pedal or lever is depressed the pressure generated opens the check valve letting air and brake fluid out of the end of the Speed Bleeder. When you release the pedal or lever and it returns to the up position, the check valve closes and prevents any air from reentering the system through the Speed Bleeder. When bubble free fluid is evident you close the Speed Bleeder. In the closed position it works just like your stock bleeder screw and prevents any brake fluid from leaking out. That is all there is to bleeding your brakes. If at a later date you need to bleed your brakes, the patented thread sealing system makes it easy to open the bleeder screw to perform the bleeding operation. It is made of quality materials:
    Color : The color of the Speed Bleeders will vary from a silver color, to a gold color, to a copper color. All Stainless Steel Speed Bleeders are silver in color. Two of the Speed Bleeders are for the front calipers and one is for the rear caliper. | eBay!

    Leave a comment:


  • Cheapa$$jimmy
    replied
    You could use a bulb syringe to remove most of the old fluid from the reservoir. Put a box end wrench on the bleeder. Attach 1/4th inch clear tubing to end of bleeder. put other end of tubing in a jar, submerged in fluid and lower than bleeder. Open bleeder. Add fresh fluid to reservoir ,slowly pump brake lever. Watch fluid become clear as it moves in tube towards the jar. Add more fluid as needed. Close bleeder and follow Scraper's advice about keeping brake fluid off the paint ! Cheers.

    Leave a comment:


  • daveto
    commented on 's reply
    Air powered vacuum pump with a 2litre tank. It’s how I have done cars for 20 years, only difference is the hose contraption. For cars I have an adaptor to keep the bottle upside down over most reservoirs. Just don’t run out of new fluid or you get to start over. I also use the same vacuum pump when I’m done to set the reservoir to the correct level cuz it’s usually overfull.

  • Scraper
    replied
    Cover you tank/etc with towels and have some soapy water ready to immediately flush any brake fluid off paint...

    Leave a comment:


  • Shores
    replied
    Originally posted by RAM View Post
    I was trying to keep it simple but, your system is interesting. Did you use a manual vacuum pump ? Something like MityVac?
    Just go to a feed and grain store and get a large hypodermic syringe. Attach a vinyl tube to the end and suck the fluid down through the bleeder valve.

    Leave a comment:


  • RAM
    replied
    I was trying to keep it simple but, your system is interesting. Did you use a manual vacuum pump ? Something like MityVac?

    Leave a comment:

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